Articles & Advice

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It’s Never Too Early
  • Terrilynn's Top 10 Tips for College Success: Preplanning for College

    I have taught academic success strategies to many people over the years. There is no denying that college can be challenging. The better the college, often the more it costs and the more competitive it becomes. There are as many ways to achieve your college goals as colleges and resources available. Preplanning for college involves researching, creating a plan, and overcoming obstacles.

  • Part Two : Student + Nature = The Biophilic Campus

    In part two of this two-part series, Tricia Roy breaks down the importance of incorporating biophilia into your campus lifestyle. If you’ve ever enjoyed a scenic mountain view or a swim at the beach, you have probably experienced the phenomenon known as biophilia. Not only is biophilia a fascinating subject for interdisciplinary study, it just might help you do better in school. To read the part one of this series, click here

  • Developing Pathways to Success in the Classroom

    This is the fourth in a series of articles designed for new students. If you are an incoming freshman or parent of one, you may want to check out my previous articles on registering for your first semester classes, how to spend your first week on campus, and a particularly good companion to this article, how to embrace failure.

  • Befriending Failure

    One of the toughest aspects surrounding the transition from high school to college is the sudden raising of expectations. Students who earned a high GPA in high school with minimal effort will find themselves suddenly drowning if they do not quickly update their study habits. Students who found comfort in their prescribed high school schedule may now struggle with time management. Former prom kings and queens may not naturally assimilate into their new social setting. Student-athletes who were the star of their high school team may now find themselves back on the end of the bench-if they had ever been there in the first place. The first semester on campus is a vortex of new experiences. While students may experience it in unique ways, failure, to some extent, is inevitable.

  • Interacting with Instructors

    College instructors are difficult to put in a box. While high school courses can differ in structure, they tend to have consistent rules and social standards and are usually taught by individuals with similar training. University classrooms, on the other hand, allow for much more of the instructor's personality to come out. A potentially daunting task for incoming students is learning how to interact with their instructors. This is not optional. Unlike high school teachers, university faculty are not obligated to reach out to students. Instead, students are responsible for contacting their instructors when they need help or clarification. Thankfully, some consistent principles for interacting with instructors and other faculty do exist. This article will provide some quick ground rules to make this process easier.

Money Matters
  • Beyond Financial Aid: Funding Strategies for College Costs

    A reasonable person would assume that the cost of an undergraduate education would be easy to calculate. Unfortunately, calculating the "True Cost" is complicated.

  • Why Private College & Universities?

    If you're new to the SAGE Scholars Tuition Rewards program, you may notice that our consortium of over 440 member institutions is made up of private colleges and universities. Like many families, you may be wondering, why does SAGE Scholars champion a private college education? We break down the reasons in this article.

  • Affordability - Factors To Consider When Looking At College Costs

    Colleges have a “list price” of tuition. Don’t let this scare you away from considering a private college education. Not only is the “list price” unlikely to be the price that you actually pay. In fact, a private college may cost less than a state school.

  • Financial Aid vs. College Funding

    To know how to best pay for a college education, families need to know three numbers: The total annual Cost of Attendance, Financial Aid, and the Expected Family Contribution. In this article you can learn how to calculate these numbers and plan for the future.

  • A Private College May Cost Less Than You Think

    Don’t let the list price of tuition scare you away from considering a private college education—it may actually end up costing less than a state school. 64% of students at a private college graduate in 4 years vs. 37% at public universities, saving a lot of time and money.

High School Students
  • Developing Pathways to Success in the Classroom

    This is the fourth in a series of articles designed for new students. If you are an incoming freshman or parent of one, you may want to check out my previous articles on registering for your first semester classes, how to spend your first week on campus, and a particularly good companion to this article, how to embrace failure.

  • Befriending Failure

    One of the toughest aspects surrounding the transition from high school to college is the sudden raising of expectations. Students who earned a high GPA in high school with minimal effort will find themselves suddenly drowning if they do not quickly update their study habits. Students who found comfort in their prescribed high school schedule may now struggle with time management. Former prom kings and queens may not naturally assimilate into their new social setting. Student-athletes who were the star of their high school team may now find themselves back on the end of the bench-if they had ever been there in the first place. The first semester on campus is a vortex of new experiences. While students may experience it in unique ways, failure, to some extent, is inevitable.

  • Interacting with Instructors

    College instructors are difficult to put in a box. While high school courses can differ in structure, they tend to have consistent rules and social standards and are usually taught by individuals with similar training. University classrooms, on the other hand, allow for much more of the instructor's personality to come out. A potentially daunting task for incoming students is learning how to interact with their instructors. This is not optional. Unlike high school teachers, university faculty are not obligated to reach out to students. Instead, students are responsible for contacting their instructors when they need help or clarification. Thankfully, some consistent principles for interacting with instructors and other faculty do exist. This article will provide some quick ground rules to make this process easier.

  • The Beginner's Guide to Creating Your Own Luck

    Not everyone believes in luck, at least in the sense that a four-leaf clover or rabbit's foot will change the outcome of a lottery ticket or the big game. However, it is impossible to say that chance does not affect peoples' success. The circumstances people are born determine much of their life trajectory. It is harder to fault those born in tougher circumstances for underachieving, while successful parents' children are frequently successful. Whether one buys into the superstitions or not, it is hard to deny luck exists, at least in the sense that some events left to chance will inevitably favor some over others.

  • Quick Advice for Getting Involved on Campus

    Student engagement is among the most undervalued aspects of university campuses. A Gallup study in 2018 showed that "engaged students are 2.5 times more likely to say that they get excellent grades and do well in school, and they are 4.5 times more likely to be hopeful about the future than their actively disengaged peers." Not only are engaged students remarkably better performers, but they also appear to be much more confident when their time on campus has ended. With the importance of being involved established, the remainder of this article will guide students toward becoming more invested in their campus.

College Admissions
  • Scholarship Essays 101

    Writing can be daunting. If you're like me, when you sit down to write, you slide into a series of what-ifs: What if I can’t do this? What if I don’t get the scholarship I need? What if they tell me no? Look no further! I'm here to help make scholarship writing a little bit easier!

  • Joy Rather Than Anxiety: A New College Application Paradigm?

    In a December, 2021, blog, Jenny Rickard, President and CEO of Common App, stated that its goal is to create “a college admissions process that sparks joy rather than anxiety.” For those students applying to the most highly selective colleges, and for those whose financial aid awards will ultimately determine if, or where, they matriculate, that goal, while admirable, is probably not attainable. An analogy, perhaps, would be to suggest that students and alumni of a lower-seeded NCAA March Madness basketball team could, prior to and during the game, watch with no anxiety – only joy. Highly unlikely! Whether the Common App goal, joy rather than anxiety, is relevant for all students is debatable, but it could be more broadly defined to include a second cohort: colleges’ Enrollment staffs.

  • So, You Want To Take A Gap Year?

    How students choose to spend this time varies, but for many students gap years can help them gain real-world experiences that improve the quality of their application. If done right, a gap year can be purposeful and help students derive more meaning from their college education. In this article we've gathered some experiences and activities that can help boost your application and maximize your gap year.

  • What to do When You’ve Been Rejected from Your Dream School

    For many students, the college applications process is an emotional rollercoaster. Your peers may celebrate their college acceptance or experience disappointment after receiving rejections from their dream schools. After one of the most tumultuous and competitive college admissions cycles to date, many students wonder what more they could've done to receive admission into their choice college.

  • Tips For Creating A College Admission Video Portfolio

    Though a relatively new component to the college application, many schools adopt this short supplemental to further showcase students, their communities, and their personalities. In this article you'll find some helpful tips to help you create a high-quality video portfolio that doesn't require you to be a skilled blogger or content creator. Remember, what matters most is content, creativity, and authenticity. You're the star of this show!

Financial Aid
  • Beyond Financial Aid: Funding Strategies for College Costs

    A reasonable person would assume that the cost of an undergraduate education would be easy to calculate. Unfortunately, calculating the "True Cost" is complicated.

  • The FAFSA Form & CSS Profile

    With the start of a new school year, SAGE Scholars is committed to helping families prepare for higher education. We have put together helpful guidelines and tips on filing your FAFSA form and completing your CSS Profile.

  • Affordability - Factors To Consider When Looking At College Costs

    Colleges have a “list price” of tuition. Don’t let this scare you away from considering a private college education. Not only is the “list price” unlikely to be the price that you actually pay. In fact, a private college may cost less than a state school.

  • The Five Common Myths: FAFSA

    If you need financial aid to pay for college, completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form is your ticket to affordability. However, many myths continue to circulate that deter students from ever filling out FAFSA, which means they’re missing out on an opportunity to lessen the financial commitment of a college education. In this article we dispel some of the most common myths about FAFSA.

  • Financial Aid vs. College Funding

    To know how to best pay for a college education, families need to know three numbers: The total annual Cost of Attendance, Financial Aid, and the Expected Family Contribution. In this article you can learn how to calculate these numbers and plan for the future.

Athletics & Extra Curriculars
  • Quick Advice for Getting Involved on Campus

    Student engagement is among the most undervalued aspects of university campuses. A Gallup study in 2018 showed that "engaged students are 2.5 times more likely to say that they get excellent grades and do well in school, and they are 4.5 times more likely to be hopeful about the future than their actively disengaged peers." Not only are engaged students remarkably better performers, but they also appear to be much more confident when their time on campus has ended. With the importance of being involved established, the remainder of this article will guide students toward becoming more invested in their campus.

  • Why Do Clubs in College Matter?

    You might think the time for clubs is best left in the past during your high school days. However, clubs in college are important for understanding who you are, making friends, gaining experience in your desired field, and making connections with your professors and future employers. Besides these benefits, you might want to have fun, which is extremely important to your overall physical and mental well-being in college. Clubs can make you an overall better and well-rounded student.

  • “Is the Writing Center Worth It?”

    This column is the first in a new series titled, "Is It Worth It?". This series will explore the pros and cons of the habits, lifehacks, and college readiness tricks given to incoming college students so that you can make informed decisions and devote your time to what works for you.

  • College Athletics Series: Considerations For Incoming Athletes

    This three-part series will guide prospective and incoming college athletes through student-athlete life. Part one of this series spotlights advice from a former Division I All-American about what to consider before arriving on campus. Part two will explore the college recruiting process, and part three features SAGE Scholar member college programs with outstanding athletics success.

  • Benefits of the Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)

    This two-part series will explain the benefits of the Federal Work-Study program as well as how to use the Career Center during your educational journey.

College Life
  • Terrilynn's Top 10 Tips for College Success: Preplanning for College

    I have taught academic success strategies to many people over the years. There is no denying that college can be challenging. The better the college, often the more it costs and the more competitive it becomes. There are as many ways to achieve your college goals as colleges and resources available. Preplanning for college involves researching, creating a plan, and overcoming obstacles.

  • Part One: Student + Nature = The Biophilic Campus

    In this two-part series, Tricia Roy discusses the importance of incorporating biophilia into your campus lifestyle. If you've ever enjoyed a scenic mountain view or a swim at the beach, you have probably experienced the phenomenon known as biophilia. Not only is biophilia a fascinating subject for interdisciplinary study, it just might help you do better in school.

  • Part Two : Student + Nature = The Biophilic Campus

    In part two of this two-part series, Tricia Roy breaks down the importance of incorporating biophilia into your campus lifestyle. If you’ve ever enjoyed a scenic mountain view or a swim at the beach, you have probably experienced the phenomenon known as biophilia. Not only is biophilia a fascinating subject for interdisciplinary study, it just might help you do better in school. To read the part one of this series, click here

  • Terrilynn’s Top 10 Tips for College Success: Finding Your Happy Place

    Every year new students arrive at college. The similarities to high school end right after parents, siblings, mentors, and caretakers leave for home. If the media is to be believed, colleges will be enrolling students in despair. College has become a metaphor for lack of well-being, and many students have tuned out. Social challenges and upheavals aside, college is not high school. College is where you, the student, are put in charge of achieving academic and social results-and for many students, this total control of personal, academic, and social success happens for the first time.

  • Developing Pathways to Success in the Classroom

    This is the fourth in a series of articles designed for new students. If you are an incoming freshman or parent of one, you may want to check out my previous articles on registering for your first semester classes, how to spend your first week on campus, and a particularly good companion to this article, how to embrace failure.

Life After College
  • How to Use the Career Center Effectively

    It is likely that while you are managing course assignments and moving along your educational journey, you have had little time to consider all of your career options after graduation. While you probably have career goals you want to accomplish, you may not know where to start. This is when the Career Center is helpful. The primary purpose of this college resource is to help you master the required skills necessary to succeed in your search for a new career after graduation. The Career Center is the perfect starting point for finding your career path and preparing for your future job search success.

  • Benefits of the Federal Work-Study Program (FWS)

    This two-part series will explain the benefits of the Federal Work-Study program as well as how to use the Career Center during your educational journey.

  • The Best College Extracurriculars To Strengthen Your Résumé

    Extracurricular activities are not only a great way to engage in campus life and build community, but they also can help students build a strong resume that signals to employers your unique skill sets and passions. Due to the ease of online applications, many resumes are first scanned by computer software and don’t ever make it into the recruiter’s hands. While everyone knows to list paid jobs on resumes, it may come as a surprise that you can also list certain extracurricular activities. With the new semester in full swing and summer fast approaching, we’ve compiled a non-exhaustive list of top extracurricular activities recruiters look for on resumes. For those students who are beginning to formulate a plan for post-grad life, these experiences—the skill sets gained from them—will broaden your horizons both on campus and post-graduation.

  • 5 Tips on How to Make the Most Out of Your Internship

    Five Tips on How to Make the Most Out of Your Internship

General Info
  • Part One: Student + Nature = The Biophilic Campus

    In this two-part series, Tricia Roy discusses the importance of incorporating biophilia into your campus lifestyle. If you've ever enjoyed a scenic mountain view or a swim at the beach, you have probably experienced the phenomenon known as biophilia. Not only is biophilia a fascinating subject for interdisciplinary study, it just might help you do better in school.

  • Part Two : Student + Nature = The Biophilic Campus

    In part two of this two-part series, Tricia Roy breaks down the importance of incorporating biophilia into your campus lifestyle. If you’ve ever enjoyed a scenic mountain view or a swim at the beach, you have probably experienced the phenomenon known as biophilia. Not only is biophilia a fascinating subject for interdisciplinary study, it just might help you do better in school. To read the part one of this series, click here

  • Befriending Failure

    One of the toughest aspects surrounding the transition from high school to college is the sudden raising of expectations. Students who earned a high GPA in high school with minimal effort will find themselves suddenly drowning if they do not quickly update their study habits. Students who found comfort in their prescribed high school schedule may now struggle with time management. Former prom kings and queens may not naturally assimilate into their new social setting. Student-athletes who were the star of their high school team may now find themselves back on the end of the bench-if they had ever been there in the first place. The first semester on campus is a vortex of new experiences. While students may experience it in unique ways, failure, to some extent, is inevitable.

  • The Beginner's Guide to Creating Your Own Luck

    Not everyone believes in luck, at least in the sense that a four-leaf clover or rabbit's foot will change the outcome of a lottery ticket or the big game. However, it is impossible to say that chance does not affect peoples' success. The circumstances people are born determine much of their life trajectory. It is harder to fault those born in tougher circumstances for underachieving, while successful parents' children are frequently successful. Whether one buys into the superstitions or not, it is hard to deny luck exists, at least in the sense that some events left to chance will inevitably favor some over others.

  • Managing Coursework for Students with Disabilities

    There are times when a student may need support completing required academic assignments. They often do not seek help because they are unsure where to turn or whom to speak to about their issues. Students who need additional support to meet the academic standards of their university successfully can get assistance from the office for students with disabilities. This service ensures that all course materials are accessible to all students, regardless of specialized learning needs. Qualified students can receive many helpful resources to help them confidently complete their program requirements. Also, the tips and tricks they teach you may help your career.

Want To Join The Newsroom?

To provide our SAGE Scholars’ families the knowledge they need to prepare and matriculate into member schools, we seek highly qualified writers and students to contribute to our Newsroom. Interested in joining the team?

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